Category Archives: ADHD

“Please Don’t Tell Me How to Parent My ADHD Child”

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“No one really understands what we go through with our child,” the mother of a recently diagnosed boy with attention deficit disorder (ADD ADHD) lamented, as we discussed the kinds of encounters, like childish outbursts and aggressive impulses, that sour family gatherings. I knew what she meant.

Trips to see grandparents, aunts and uncles, who live far away can be a great learning experience and give children a sense of the larger family network. But when relatives don’t understand the thought and planning that goes into raising a “high-maintenance,” developmentally different youngster, they may believe that your child’s behavior is the result of poor parenting — namely yours.

Child-friendly treatment interventions for ADHD: Simon Says

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Use the “language of play” to provide children with strategies and tools that will help them improve performance in daily activities that are impacted by ADHD.
The Simon Says manual provides a detailed plan for therapists to use in working with children who show symptoms of ADHD.  It contains dozens of reproducible stories, activities.  You can help kids improve performance in: 
  • working memory 
  • impulse control 
  • goal orientation 
  • ability to shift focus

 

What Ever Happened to Rise and Shine?

What Ever Happened to Rise and Shine?

Ah, mornings. Remember the days of slow-roasted coffee over an outstretched Sports page? Or a stationary bike ride with Matt Lauer and Al Roker?

As any parent of a child with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD) knows, the leisurely morning is gone forever. From now on, we are perpetually trying to beat the clock, sometimes while beating our heads against the wall, getting our kids to wake up (or in the case of early risers, making sure they are safe), fed, dressed, washed, and ready to go.

Parents of non-ADD/ADHD kids are amazed to hear about the measures ADD/ADHD families take to get through a morning. We come up with all kinds of ways to make our routines as seamless as possible, but in most cases, our mornings remain a struggle. Here’s what eased my mornings while raising two daughters, one with ADD/ADHD.

ADHD and ODD: Parenting Your Defiant Child

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Every parent of a child with attention deficit disorder knows what it’s like to deal with ADHD behavior problems — sometimes a child lashes out or refuses to comply with even the most benign request. But about half of all parents who have children with live with severe behavior problems and discipline challenges on an almost daily basis.

That’s because 40 percent of children with ADHD also develop oppositional defiant disorder, a condition marked by chronic aggression, frequent outbursts, and a tendency to argue, ignore requests, and engage in intentionally annoying behavior.

How bad can it get? Consider these real-life children diagnosed with both ADHD and ODD:

ADHD Diets: Eating Tips for ADHD Teens

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD) symptoms and medications means those with the condition need to pay particular attention to diet, appetite, and nutrition. Here’s how to make sure teens are making healthy food habits!

When attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD) teens are left to eat on their own terms, they often don’t figure out what makes up a healthy ADD/ADHD diet. They may spend lunch period talking with friends or forget to come home at dinnertime. And when they do sit down at the table, they don’t stay there for long. What’s more, ADD/ADHD medication cause appetite loss, and without internal cues to eat, she will forget to do so — not a good thing, considering the fact that ADDers tend to burn more calories than their non-hyperactive counterparts.

So what are some good eating plans or diets for ADD/ADHD teens to follow? Here are some ideas that may help you:

Bend the Traditional “Healthy Diet” Rules

Fajitas for breakfast? Cereal for dinner? Why not? ADD/ADHD teens need to eat food that’s interesting to them at the moment. If your teen takes medication, he will want an after-school snack and a before-bed snack. Forget the bromide about “spoiling their supper.” Get food into them when the opportunity arises. http://www.additudemag.com/adhd/article/8376.html

ADHD Behavior: Banishing Bad Moods

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John’s mom came to his session in tears. “What can I do about the horrible mood that John is in every day after school?” Children with attention deficit disorder (ADD ADHD) often experience emotions more intensely than their peers, and can become overwhelmed by sadness or worry. Depression and anxiety, which are primarily disorders of mood regulation, commonly coexist with the symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity.


Exercising the Mind to Treat Attention Deficits

Which will it be — the berries or the chocolate dessert? Homework or the Xbox? Finish that memo, or roam Facebook?

Such quotidian decisions test a mental ability called cognitive control, the capacity to maintain focus on an important choice while ignoring other impulses. Poor planning, wandering attention and trouble inhibiting impulses all signify lapses in cognitive control. Now a growing stream of research suggests that strengthening this mental muscle, usually with exercises in so-called mindfulness, may help children and adults cope with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and its adult equivalent, attention deficit disorder.   http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/05/12/exercising-the-mind-to-treat-attention-deficits/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=1&

Activities to Teach Children Impulse Control

It's going to be a lot harder to get work done with a broken pencil.

Learning to control impulses in childhood means you’ll be able to control them in adulthood, when the consequence of punching the guy who called you a name is jail time, not a time-out. Scholastic.com reports that kids with poor impulse control can also struggle with learning because they have less mental capacity available for learning. Helping children develop impulse control is an important factor in helping them be successful and satisfied later in life.

The Waldorf Approach to Attention Related Disorders

The Waldorf Approach  to Attention Related Disorders.  It is generally recognized that a busy environment aggravates ADD/ADHD behavior. In her  recent book, ADHD Resource Specialist Sandra Rief 11 talks of ADHD children having “visual  processing problems,” and makes a strong case for “reducing visual clutter.”

The Waldorf Approach to Attention Related Disorders. It is generally recognized that a busy environment aggravates ADD/ADHD behavior. In her recent book, ADHD Resource Specialist Sandra Rief 11 talks of ADHD children having “visual processing problems,” and makes a strong case for “reducing visual clutter.”

 

The Seven Types of ADD — and How to Treat Each One

The Seven Types of ADD -- and How to Treat Each One

As the founder of six Amen Clinics, I bring a multidisciplinary approach to diagnosing and treating brain based disorders including attention deficit disorder and coexisting conditions. For over twenty years, I’ve used SPECT brain scans (along with other diagnostic techniques) to develop individual, targeted treatment plans for each patient. Early on, I discovered through brain SPECT patterns that attention deficit is not a single or a simple disorder.

School Strategies for ADHD Kids

School Strategies for ADHD Kids (Winning the ADHD Battle) by Bonnie Terry, Book #20 for 2014 #emptyshelfchallenge

I work with parents as well as teachers helping them make learning easier for their kids, especially those that have ADHD or other learning problems. This past year the questions regarding how to work effectively with ADHD kids in the classroom kept coming up. Teachers are frustrated. Parents are frustrated. This book is the outcome of that frustration.

School Strategies for ADHD Kids is for parents to know what can be done successfully in a classroom to make learning easier for their ADHD kids and for teachers to help them have tested strategies that really work regarding managing the classroom and teaching their kids that have ADHD.

This book is different from my other books. Those books are the methods for improving reading, spelling, writing, math, or study skills. They are curriculum based. This book relates to how do you manage your day so that learning is more effective in your classroom when you have kids that have attention deficits – whether they are inattentive or hyperactive.

There are specific things you can do to make learning easy for your attention deficit disorder kids, whether you are in a classroom, homeschooling, or it is homework time at home. School Strategies for ADHD Kids gives you specific strategies that you can implement tomorrow that really work! Order it today!

ADHD Social Skills for Playdates: Help Your ADHD Child Keep Friends

Katie was excited to have Loren, a fellow third-grader, come over for a play date. As soon as Loren arrived, Katie told her the rules (which she made up) for every game they played, and Loren submissively followed the directions — up to a point. When Loren won a game, or didn’t follow the rules to Katie’s liking, Katie got upset and yelled at her. After getting into the car to go home, Loren’s mom asked her daughter if she had a good time. Loren shouted, “No — I’m never playing with her again.”

The 8 Best ADHD/LD Parenting Books

Parenting a child with ADHD or a learning disability can be overwhelming at times, but with the right tips, tricks, and insider knowledge, it doesn’t have to be. We’ve gathered together a list of the best parenting books for understanding and managing your ADHD or LD child. With the right help, you can put your child on the path to being healthy, happy, and in charge of their ADHD.

Classic Games to Strengthen Executive Functions

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https://www.therapyandlearningservices.com/blog/part-one-5-classic-games-to-strengthen-executive-functions-ages-7

I remember the giddiness that I felt when I read my first research article on how great game playing is for developing cognitive/EF skills {speech and language of course too!}. From that point on, my therapy and coaching took on an entirely new look/feel.

Inattentive ADHD Children: How to Treat Attention-Related Issues That Appear Like Behavior Problems

Parenting Strategies for Children with ADHD or Inattentive ADD.

As an “invisible” disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD) in children is often misperceived as bad behavior. The inattentive child may be misread as willfully disregarding commands or dragging her feet.

ADD/ADHD often forces a child to process thoughts and make transitions more slowly. Without this understanding, a child’s inattentive tendencies can cause conflict at home. Here are some strategies to help avoid it.

The Difference Between Disruptive Behavior Disorders and ADHD

You may have heard people use phrases like “out of control” or “wild” to describe kids who have a hard time controlling their emotions and impulsive behavior. If they’re talking about your child, you might wonder if your child has a disruptive behavior disorder or ADHD. You might even think disruptive behavior disorders and ADHD are the same thing.

Two brothers wrestling with each other outdoors

Teaching Your Impulsive Child to Pause. www.imperfectfamilies.com

All kids are impulsive. They hit, bite, kick and yell without thinking through the consequences. They feel a feeling and act on it. We can blow this off as “kids will be kids” or send them to the corner until they “learn their lesson.” Or, we can introduce our kids to the PAUSE.

I Can’t Sit Still

From a child's point of view about ADHD. Following the story is suggested activities that relate to its theme, followed by a two-page section that offers advice to parents. Here is the story of a child who has ADHD--and is mistakenly perceived as being unruly and incapable of following instructions. Ultimately, this little boy overcomes this problem with help from the family doctor, his parents, and his teacher.

 

From a child’s point of view about ADHD. Following the story is suggested activities that relate to its theme, followed by a two-page section that offers advice to parents. Here is the story of a child who has ADHD–and is mistakenly perceived as being unruly and incapable of following instructions. Ultimately, this little boy overcomes this problem with help from the family doctor, his parents, and his teacher.

Helping Children Find Focus – Massage Calms ADHD Kids

Two recent studies conducted by the Touch Research Institute at the University of Miami reported that regular massage therapy can be an effective treatment for kids with ADHD.

Two recent studies conducted by the Touch Research Institute at the University of Miami reported that regular massage therapy can be an effective treatment for kids with ADHD. One study found adolescent boys who received ten 15-minute daily massages were observed by their teachers to be more focused in their schoolwork, and they fidgeted less. In addition, the children rated themselves as happier than those who participated in a relaxation therapy program.

Impulse Control Games for Children

Learning Impulse Control through Play

Children that learn impulse control at an early age often have better grades and a more successful lifestyle later. Impulse control also helps children stop and think before they act, reducing poor behavior and allowing children to interact positively and healthily with others. Both average children and children with cognitive disorders can benefit from impulse control games.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/info_7990471_impulse-control-games-children.html

Just Like Flossing: 5 Ways to Improve Your Study Habits, by Deanna Kim, M.Ed.

Just Like Flossing: 5 Ways to Improve Your Study Habits, by Deanna Kim, M.Ed.

Deanna Kim is an educational therapist at Summit Center Walnut Creek and at the Athenian School in Danville, where she coaches students in executive functioning to improve T.O.P. skills (Time Management, Organization, and Planning). If you would like more in-depth and personalized coaching with Deanna, please call (925) 939-7500 or email info@summitcenter.us to schedule an appointment.

Bright Not Broken

The talents of some of our most brilliant kids may never be recognized because these children fall into a group known as twice exceptional, or "2e". These kids are both gifted and diagnosed with a disability—often ADHD or an Autism Spectrum Disorder—leading teachers and parents to overlook the child's talents and focus solely on weaknesses. This book sheds light on this vibrant population, identifying who twice exceptional children are and taking an unflinching look at why they're stuck.

Bright Not Broken sheds new light on this vibrant population by identifying who twice exceptional children are and taking an unflinching look at why they’re stuck. The first work to boldly examine the widespread misdiagnosis and controversies that arise from our current diagnostic system, it serves as a wake-up call for parents and professionals to question why our mental health and education systems are failing our brightest children.

Taming the Temper-Prone ADDer

Anger Management Tips for Adults with ADHD

I reminded Mike that he must maintain realistic expectations about his son, who was easily distracted. Mike came to see that neither he nor his son was perfect, and that he should adjust his own imperfect behavior. Instead of yelling at his teen for forgetting to do a chore, Mike worked on helping him remember to do it by posting a list on a bulletin board in the kitchen and reinforcing it with text messages during the day.

Free Top 20 ADD/ADHD Accommodations that Work!

Top 20 ADHD Accommodations and Modifications That Work - Typically children diagnosed with ADHD have developmentally inappropriate behavior, including poor attention skills, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. While there may be disagreement among professionals regarding the incidence rate and even the actual diagnosis, all teachers will agree that all students are different and a single approach or strategy will not work for each and every student.

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD) is a neurobiological disorder. Typically children diagnosed with ADHD have developmentally inappropriate behavior, including poor attention skills, impulsivity, and hyperactivity.  While there may be disagreement among professionals regarding the incidence rate and even the actual diagnosis, all teachers will agree that all students are different and a single approach or strategy will not work for each and every student. Differentiation is the key to any successful classroom.  In this case, success is define as all students learning to their highest potential.

Therapeutic Interventions Using Non-Therapeutic Games: Behavior Basics for K-8

Therapeutic Interventions Using Non-Therapeutic Games: Behavior Basics for K-8:Amazon:Books

Therapeutic Interventions Using Non-Therapeutic Games: Behavior Basics for K-8 is a creative twist on the traditional practice of using games in therapy. This book takes games that everyone knows and loves and gives a concrete, hands-on example of behavioral strategies for children from kindergarten through the eighth grade. The sessions and activity pages can be used by anyone who is in the role of helping children determine appropriate behaviors.

Understanding Your Child’s Trouble With Focus

Does your child have trouble with focus? This overview covers common signs of inattention and what could be causing it. #ADHD #executivefunctioning Repinned by SOS Inc. Resources pinterest.com/sostherapy/.

By Amanda Morin

Does your child constantly forget things, make careless mistakes and seem like she’s daydreaming? If so, you may wonder why she can’t or won’t pay attention.

Many kids with those symptoms have attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). But there are learning issues that also make kids appear inattentive. Learn more about what causes issues with focus and how you can help.

Social Skills for Kids with ADD (ADHD)

by Cathi Cohen, LCSW

“Nobody wants to play with me.”

“I never get invited to birthday parties.”

“The kids were teasing me today at school.”

“I don’t fit in.”

Sound familiar? We’ve all heard children say these things from time to time. Comments like these usually reflect normal growing pains. In some cases, however, children say these things on a regular basis. If that’s true for your child, he may be communicating a need for help.

The 3 R’s of Parenting a Child with ADHD, by Jim Forgan, PhD

Today’s article is brought to us by Jim Forgan, PhD,  a licensed school psychologist in Jupiter, FL, and author of the book Raising Boys with ADHD. As I read this book over the summer, I found myself wishing it had been available when my son had been diagnosed with ADHD back in 2008. This would have been a most helpful first-read at that time. In fact, I found this book to be a handbook to raising a child with ADHD (not just boys) — a real go-to guide for parenting, education, and social issues surrounding ADHD. Whether you are new to ADHD or not, you are sure to get some valuable tips from this book! It is part of my list of Top 5 FIRST reads when your child is diagnosed with ADHD. ~Penny

How to fend off ADHD afternoon meltdowns sparked by hunger, exhaustion, and medication wearing off

ADHD and the Afternoon Crash: Hungry, Tired, Medication Worn Off

We parents know that it’s a roller-coaster ride from the time our ADHD kids get home from school or camp until they go to bed. That shouldn’t be surprising. Kids walk through the door mentally exhausted, physically edgy, and starving. What’s more, their medication has usually worn off, causing their ADHD symptoms to return with a vengeance. Here, an expert offers her six best strategies for surviving the afternoon angst.

5 Focus Exercises for ADHD Kids

By Dr. Robert Myers, Child Psychologist

5 Focus Exercises for ADHD Kids

 

 

 

 

 

ADHD is a “brain difference.” Kids with ADHD have some significant differences in their cognitive ability, emotional sensitivity and activity level when compared to other children. What this means is that their “skill set” is different from 95% of the children in their class. Their working memory is often not as well-developed as it might be in other kids their age. It can be hard for them to control their ability to concentrate, plan and process information. The good news? Neuroscience has recently discovered that brain exercises can dramatically improve these functions. When these exercises are successful, they essentially build or strengthen “circuits” within your child’s brain. (In some cases, these changes can actually be  seen in brain scans.) Read more: http://www.empoweringparents.com/5-focus-exercises-for-adhd-kids.php#ixzz3kRCpaQFj

Lost, Late or Burnt Out?

Lost, Late, or Burnt Out? | Boost Your ADHD Child's Executive Functions:

Executive functioning is “an umbrella term for the mental processes that serve a supervisory role in thinking and behavior. It allows us to create a master plan, initiate it in a timely manner, react to changes and challenges, and keep the goals in mind over time,” according to Joyce Cooper-Kahn, Ph.D., a clinical child psychologist.
Let’s look at some of the reasons children begin to fail as the school year progresses, and see how we can help them.

4-in-1 Falling Blocks

Four-in-One Jenga has attachment, impulse control, social skills, and feelings labels for the four sides of Jenga® blocks, turning one Jenga® game into four different therapeutic games!:

Four-games-in-One Falling Blocks has attachment, impulse control, social skills, and feelings labels for the four sides of the game blocks, turning one game into four different therapeutic games!

For children with attachment problems, the Attachment cards provide suggested behaviors/activities that create mutual recognition such as positive eye contact, safe and gentle touches, shared emotions, and cooperation.

For impulsive children, the Impulse Control cards provide opportunities to slow down and reflect on the consequences of acting on impulse by giving various scenarios and asking “What might happen?”

For children with social problems, the Social Skills cards use strengths-based and cognitive-behavioral questions to help children (1) identify times when they have engaged in specific prosocial behaviors, (2) describe various complex prosocial behaviors and (3) identify the fine lines between appropriate and inappropriate behaviors.

For children who need to develop better self-awareness and emotional competence, the Feelings cards ask children to associate an event with a feeling.

30 Sensory Strategies to Help Kids Pay Attention

paying attention titleSome children who experience difficulty with paying attention may need less sensory input because they become distracted or overwhelmed by certain sensory experiences.  However, many children are better able to attend to and participate when tasks appeal to the senses.  They need more sensory input to regulate themselves and stay focused.

Your Child is Misbehaving, Are You Listening?

Boy with Megaphone

By: Heather T. Forbes, LCSW

The natural flow of the developmental journey of a child is to gradually release this need for attention, moving from a state of dependence to a state of balanced independence. The time period for this is about 18 years. We are the only animals in the animal kingdom that have our children under our care for this length of time. Expecting our children to not need our attention or to view it as a negative behavioral issue during these 18 years goes against our biology.

When children do not know how to verbally express their needs (which is predominately the case during early childhood), they “speak” through their behaviors. In other words, behavior is a form of communication. When a parent can stop, pause, and “listen” to the behavior of a child, it can become quite obvious what the child is saying. Looking at the behavior from an objective perspective also unveils the logic behind the child’s behavior.

Mindsight

A groundbreaking book on the healing power of “mindsight,” the potent skill that is the basis for both emotional and social intelligence. Mindsight allows you to make positive changes in your brain–and in your life. Using case histories from his practice, Dr. Dan Siegel shows how, by following the proper steps, nearly everyone can learn how to focus their attention on the internal world of the mind in a way that will literally change the wiring and architecture of their brain.
(Daniel J. Siegel, Random House 2010)

Wacky Ways to Succeed with ADHD

Wacky ways to Succeed with ADHD: The never before fun, creative out of the box secrets that will get you smiling and surviving with ADHD

Author: Laurie Dupar
Series: The ADHD Awareness Book Project, Book 5

In this fifth, 2015 edition of the ADHD Awareness Book Project Series, entitled “Wacky Ways to Succeed with ADHD”, we focus on the fun and uniqueness in living with ADHD. We still asked ADHD experts, “What tips, strategies or stories do you know for succeeding with ADHD?” except this time, we decid… More info →

Activities to Teach Children Impulse Control

By Laura Agadoni

If you don’t teach your child how to control impulses, you’re likely to wind up with a little hellion who has tantrums, hits others, makes mean or hurtful remarks, takes things and doesn’t understand right from wrong. Some parents mistakenly excuse those behaviors as just part of being a kid. However, parents can play a huge role in managing their child’s impulsive behaviors. The goal is to teach your child self-discipline and to be aware of how his actions might affect others. You can teach impulse control in many fun ways.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/info_8211266_activities-teach-children-impulse-control.html

What Does Research Show About the Effects of ADHD Medication?

What research shows about the effects of ADHD medication on kids:

The Child Mind Institute is dedicated to transforming mental health care for children everywhere. The organization is committed to finding more effective treatments for childhood psychiatric and learning disorders, building the science of healthy brain development, and empowering children and their families with help, hope and answers.

Hyperfocus: The Flip Side of ADHD?

Hyperfocus: The Flip Side of ADHD? | Child Mind Institute:

Harry Kimball

Senior Writer
Child Mind Institute

Mark had trouble believing his son could have ADHD. Sure, he was unusually active, and his pre-school teachers complained that he fluttered around the room like a butterfly when other kids were engaged in activities. But there was also Andy’s ability to focus intensely on certain activities, like fishing or watching a movie. How could his 5-year-old be so single-minded for three hours at a stretch if he had an attention disorder?

ADHD vs SPD: Why Is It So Darn Hard to Know the Difference?

Kids with either diagnosis can seem hyperactive, impulsive and unfocused. Combine ADHD with SPD, and the two can cause learning difficulties, make it challenging for relationships with other children and reduce a child’s ability to follow directions and/or complete tasks. However, the best way to approach each diagnosis is different.:

The problem with telling the difference between ADHD and SPD is they can often present in similar ways. Kids with either diagnosis can seem hyperactive, impulsive and unfocused. Combine ADHD with SPD, and the two can cause learning difficulties, make it challenging for relationships with other children and reduce a child’s ability to follow directions and/or complete tasks. by

ADHD and the Emotional Brain

Thomas E. Brown, author of Smart but Stuck, explains how emotions like anxiety can play a role in the brain of a child with ADHD, and how parents can help.:

Thomas E. Brown, Ph.D., is a clinical psychologist and associate director of the Yale Clinic for Attention and Related Disorders in the department of psychiatry at Yale School of Medicine.

One of my biggest realizations from working for 35 years with people with ADHD is this: You can’t understand ADHD without understanding the role of emotion in how our brains work. Here’s how I explained this in my book:

The difficulties that people with ADHD have with emotions are similar to the problems they often have in prioritizing tasks, shifting focus, and utilizing working memory. While cleaning a room, they may get interested in some photos they pick up, soon becoming completely diverted from the job they had begun….
In a similar way, many people with ADHD tend to get quickly flooded with frustration, enthusiasm, anger, affection, worry, boredom, discouragement, or other emotions … crowding out other important feelings and thoughts.

Double Whammy: Mothers and Children with ADHD

Moms and kids who share a diagnosis of attention deficit can be, in some ways, a perfect mismatch. But they're also uniquely equipped to understand and celebrate each other.:

by Katherine Ellison

Mothering a child with ADHD is not for the faint of heart — and it becomes more daunting when you, too, are struggling to stay on track every day. Still, millions of mothers now face this challenge, given the extremely high heritability rates for this vexing disorder. Research has shown that ADHD is more heritable than schizophrenia, only slightly less so than height, leading to all sorts of lively family dynamics.

Exercise Is ADHD Medication

Exercise Is ADHD Medication - Atlantic Mobile:

Physical movement improves mental focus, memory, and cognitive flexibility; new research shows just how critical it is to academic performance.                                            James Hamblin 

 

ADHD Behavior Therapy: Promoting Discipline & Focus in Kids

Research reconfirms the benefits of behavior modification. Here's how parents can make a real difference in their children's ADHD behavior – starting now.:

by Nicole Sprinkle

This is clearly shown by the landmark National Institute of Mental Health’s (NIMH) Multimodal Treatment Study of Children with ADHD. NIMH found that medication therapy alone, and medication and behavioral therapy together, resulted in the greatest improvement in children’s ADHD symptoms. In addition, the combination treatment worked best in improving ADHD-associated oppositional behaviors, as well as other areas of functioning, like interactions with parents and school.

Lancet Study: Elimination Diets Success in over 50% of ADHD Kids

Lancet Study: Elimination Diets Success in over 50% of ADHD Kids:

The Lancet will soon publish the results of the ‘Impact of Nutrition on Children with ADHD (INCA)’ study. This is yet another, very well done, study on elimination diets and ADHD. The results of this study reported two findings.

The first finding was that a strict elimination diet improved symptoms of hyperactivity, impulsive behavior, oppositional behavior and inattention. The second finding was that the benefits in these behaviors did not correspond to an increase in blood IgG levels ( a blood measure of an allergic reaction) in the kids that had behavioral changes. The second finding is interesting because it shows us that testing for IgG will not always tell us that a child has a food allergy.

Women and Adult ADHD

Elizabeth Prager is the author of the Living with Adult ADHD Blog on HealthyPlace

The first thing that comes to my mind when I think about being a woman with Adult ADHD is how long it took me to be diagnosed. I’ve read a lot on this subject and one thing that’s always stuck out to me is that young girl with ADHD don’t often look like little boys with ADHD. We don’t necessarily run around in school or blurt out answers without raising our hands. The typical little girl with ADHD is shy, quiet and able to hide her inattention with good behavior. This is one big reason why we don’t get diagnosed until college or beyond. by

The Survival Guide for Kids with ADHD

"Having ADHD doesn't mean you are stupid, lazy, crazy, bad or ill. It means there are differences in the way your brain works that make you show some ADHD traits." The Survival Guide for Kids w/ ADD or ADHD, John F. Taylor. Pinner writes: "Helps kids know they’re not alone & offers practical strategies for taking care of oneself, modifying behavior, enjoying school & having fun.":

What are ADHD? What does it mean to have ADHD? How can kids diagnosed with ADHD help themselves succeed in school, get along better at home, and form healthy, enjoyable relationships with peers? In kid-friendly language and a format that welcomes reluctant and easily distracted readers, this book helps kids know they’re not alone and offers practical strategies for taking care of oneself, modifying behavior, enjoying school, having fun, and dealing with doctors, counselors, and medication. Includes real-life scenarios, quizzes, and a special message for parents.

Celebrate the Positive Qualities of ADHD

Order your Awesome Qualities of ADHD poster today! Makes a great gift for yourself or a loved one with #ADHD. Only $15.95!:

Life with ADHD is a 24-hour, seven-day-a-week-adventure!! If you or someone you love has been diagnosed with ADHD, then you know how challenging it can be at times. Unfortunately, most of our focus is on the “negative aspects and problems” of ADHD and rarely are the strengths or positive qualities of ADHD appreciated or celebrated!!

Increasing ADHD Rates May Be Linked to Heightened Academic Expectations for Young Children

Increasing ADHD Rates May Be Linked to Heightened Academic Expectations for Young Children | Miller School of Medicine | University of Miami:

A new study led by Jeffrey P. Brosco, M.D., Ph.D., professor of clinical pediatrics at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, has identified a possible correlation between the prevalence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and increasing academic demands on young children. In an article published last month by JAMA Pediatrics, Brosco hypothesized that increased academic standards since the 1970s have contributed to the rise in diagnosis of ADHD.

Effective Consequences for ADHD Kids

Effective Consequences for ADHD Kids:

Most  well–meaning parents approach this behavior with the philosophy of “If at first  you don’t succeed, try, try again.” They continue with the same approach, only  “kicking it up a notch or two.” Or, they go from one approach to another, all  the while saying, “No matter what I do, nothing works.” I would like to give  you some simple parenting tips that would make it a breeze to get things going  in the right direction, but this is not a simple problem—which means there is  no “simple” solution. There are things you can do that will be much more  effective, though for your child with ADHD.

Top 5 Homework Frustrations — and Fixes for Each

If our kids struggle with organization, tend to procrastinate, or get distracted easily, we shouldn't be surprised when ‪#‎homework‬ is a daily disaster. But parents can transform the typical tantrums with these tips.:

Tired of the Homework Wars?

If your child with ADHD hates doing homework, you’re not alone. Executive function deficits, inattention, and learning challenges can make after-school assignments torture for our kids — and us parents, too!

Here, Ann Dolin, M.Ed, offers specific strategies that address the most common homework-related problems, like disorganization or procrastination. Does your child fit any of these common profiles?

Kids With ADHD Do Better With Therapy First, Study Finds

A Promising New Approach to Treating Children With ADHD:

Researchers at Florida International University found that kids with ADHD fared much better in their development when their first treatment is behavioral therapy rather than starting immediately on medication.

The study published by the Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology found that drugs were most effective when added as a second-line treatment for children who needed it — and often at doses that were lower than normally prescribed.

The findings, “suggest a reconsideration of the current practice of relying on medication as first-line and typically sole treatment for many ADHD children,” the researchers wrote.

5 Parent Secrets: Bring Out the Best In Your Child with ADHD How to foster happiness and succes

Raise resilient children with ADHD, dyslexia, or learning disabilities.

Every child is born with gifts. A child who has the fascinating trait called attention deficit disorder (ADHD) possesses extraordinary ones, but they may be hidden. And if they’re found, they can be tough to unwrap.

I hear from ADHD parents who say they need a plan to help them do that. Well, your wish has been granted. I have a five-step plan, called the cycle of excellence, which will reveal your ADHD child’s gifts for all to see.

 

I Saw Myself All Wrong: I Wasn’t Stupid, I Was Smart

I cleverly concealed my ADHD and dyslexia until I decided I didn’t want to, or need to, anymore.:

I advanced with ease through the ranks of LEGOs, pinch-pots, and naptime at Temple Emanuel Preschool, but I couldn’t follow simple directions. No one could touch me in Mrs. Sacker’s second-grad Chess Olympiad, but jigsaw puzzles were impossible. I was always the best speller in class, but I couldn’t read a word. I was both the smartest and the “stupidest” person I knew.

ADHD and Gifted? Helping Twice-Exceptional Kids Succeed

Join us for an expert webinar hosted by Diane M. Kennedy and Rebecca Banks-Cull on Thursday, March 19, 2015 at 1 PM Eastern Time.:

Diane M. Kennedy and Rebecca Banks-Cull are the co-founders of the Bright Not Broken-Lorna Wing Institute of America in New York. Their first book, The ADHD-Autism Connection, explores the similarities between ADHD, autism, and other related conditions. Both women began their journey into the obscure world of twice-exceptionalities with their struggles to find answers for their children.

Why It’s ‘Self-Reg,’ Not Self-Control, That Matters Most For Kids

If hyper-arousal is a normal state for many children, how can we help our kids learn to be genuinely calm? Anthropologist Barbara J. King explores a new book on self-regulation.:

In the just-published Self-Reg: How to Help Your Child (and You) Break the Stress Cycle and Successfully Engage with Life, psychologist Stuart Shanker of York University and the MEHRIT Centre in Canada asks us — parents, teachers, coaches, anyone who mentors kids — to think not in terms of self-control but of self-regulation.

17 Ways to Help Students With ADHD Concentrate

17 Ways to Help Students With ADHD Concentrate:

Research shows that students with ADHD can concentrate better when they’re allowed to fidget (here’s a link to the study). But what if this becomes a distraction for the rest of the class? We received hundreds of Facebook comments from teachers, parents, and students with great ideas for letting students quietly fidget, and here are some of our favorites:

How Praise Can Hurt: A guide to providing the right kind of feedback for your child.

How Praise Can Hurt: Providing the right kind of feedback for your child | StudyDog Parents Blog:

Praise is a key part of learning. It tells students what they are doing well. It builds confidence and self-esteem. But did you know there are two kinds of positive feedback?
The first is effort praise. It points out the child’s progress and hard work. The second type is ability praise. It focuses on talent.

My Child Just Doesn’t Listen! And More Frustrating Discipline Problems

Your child is funny, charming, and spontaneous — but sometimes, the traits that make you love her so much conspire to drive you (and everyone else) up the wall! Here, Dr. Peter Jaska shares solutions to five of the most common behavior problems for impulsive kids with ADHD.:

Your child is funny, charming, and spontaneous — but sometimes, the traits that make you love her so much conspire to drive you (and everyone else) up the wall! Here, Dr. Peter Jaska shares solutions to five of the most common behavior problems for impulsive kids with ADHD.

The Truth About Your Child’s Lies

A lie is a lie is a lie, right? Maybe not, if your child has ‪‎ADHD‬. Often, those lies are used to avoid getting blamed, to hide their own insecurities, or simply to get some attention. Learn why promoting honesty — without punishing every lie — is the best way to react when your child tells you the teacher didn’t assign any homework (for the fifth day in a row!)

Exaggerated Emotions: How and Why ADHD Triggers Intense Feelings

Emotions Rule | Your Emotional Brain:

“Challenges with processing emotions start in the brain itself. Sometimes the working memory impairments of ADHD allow a momentary emotion to become too strong, flooding the brain with one intense emotion.” Thomas Brown, Ph.D., explains why (and how) ADHD sparks such intense emotions.

Emotion-Regulating Play Therapy with ADHD Children: Staying with Playing

Emotion-Regulating Play Therapy with ADHD Children: Staying with Playing by Enrico Gnaulati:

Drawing upon contemporary psychoanalytic thought, attachment theory, and the literature on children’s emotional development, this book not only offers a novel conceptualization of ADHD but also a sophisticated and practical set of ideas for adapting play therapy to effectively treat it. It articulates an approach to understanding and helping ADHD children that expands and augments even as it challenges the usual neurocognitive and medicalized perspectives.

ADHD Motivation Tips for When Learning is Non-Negotiable

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For the child with ADHD, anything they don’t currently want to do is The Worst Thing Ever. It doesn’t matter if you are trying to teach them a new math problem or telling them to tie their shoe. There will be equal hatred for any unwanted activity.

Most children with ADHD that I know don’t respond well to negative consequences. Many children will consider the consequences worth it to get out of doing what they didn’t want to do.

Focused: ADHD & ADD Parenting Strategies for Children with Attention Deficit Disorder

Written by an expert with over 15 years of experience in treating adult ADHD and ADHD in children, Focused offers essential information to empower parents and provide immediate assistance. Learn to uncover your child’s considerable strengths and work around their obstacles with concrete, actionable strategies that improve executive functioning, support emotional development, and promote positive behavior.

Easy to Love, Difficult to Discipline: The 7 Basic Skills for Turning…

Learn how to stop policing and pleading and become the parent you want to be.

You love your children, but if you’re like most parents, you don’t always love their behavior. But how can you guide them without resorting to less-than-optimal behavior yourself? Dr. Becky Bailey’s unusual and powerful approach to parenting has made thousands of families happier and healthier.

Focusing on self-control and confidence-building for both parent and child, Dr. Bailey teaches a series

Disconnected Kids: The Groundbreaking Brain Balance Program for Children with Autism, ADHD, Dyslexia, and Other Neurological Disorders

Product Details

Each year, an estimated 1.5 million children-one out of every six-are diagnosed with autism, Asperger’s syndrome, ADHD, dyslexia, and obsessive compulsive disorder. Dr. Robert Melillo brings a fundamentally new understanding to the cause of these conditions with his revolutionary Brain Balance Program(tm). It has achieved real, fully documented results that have dramatically improved the quality of life for children and their families in every aspect: behavioral, emotional, academic, and social.